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When beauty becomes DIY: trends in make-up hacking

When beauty becomes DIY:
trends in make-up hacking

When a company releases a new product into the marketplace, there's always an intended use. Just about everything that can be purchased can be modified, stripped, tweaked, re-purposed, or yes, even hacked. Nowhere is the trend bigger than in the world of home furnishing where thousands of people enjoy taking Ikea products and finding a totally different use for a product than what was originally intended. Sometimes intrepid consumers even take multiple products and create glorious Frankenstein structures that are functional, practical, and absolutely innovative.

The same sort of thing also happens frequently with cosmetics. New techniques using products in ways foreign to their intended purpose has been happening for decades, but until now, seemed generally limited to secrets shared by professional make-up artists. Occasionally, a tip might filter through to Cosmo or Vogue, but in general, make-up was used in the manufacturer's prescribed manner. Enter the Internet, with tutorial videos, blogs, and the instant sharing of information.

Now, there are numerous pros and amateurs communicating with each other minute to minute and circulating all sorts of tips on how to use products in ways that a short time ago were unknown. There is a massive opportunity here for packaging companies, particularly those that offer application solutions. Consumers will do whatever they do with make-up, but they're always going to need some way to get products on their faces. The array of brushes, sponges, puffs, pads, spatulas, and dispensing heads available are dizzying, and often wind up being used in application techniques that suit lightning trends perfectly. Our advice to cosmetic packaging suppliers and distributors: make sure to provide a wide array of application options to accompany your containers - brands are looking to create application kits to accompany their products. They're also looking to capitalize not only on existing 15-minute trends, but to create their own and tie them to their cosmetic lines.

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Contouring

Strobing

Glazing

Baking

Chroming

Nontouring

This technique seems to have started it all. The basic procedure is pretty simple: take a dark make-up product and apply it to areas to create shadows. The effect can be used to make the face seem slimmer, minimize features that are too prominent, or give shape to features that are overshadowed. Consumers use all sorts of products to contour, including blush, foundation, eye-shadow, and other products that are not normally used for the purpose. That are too prominent, or give shape to features that are overshadowed. Consumers use all sorts of products to contour, including blush, foundation, eye-shadow, and other products that are not normally used for the purpose.

Here, bright products are used to accentuate the high points of the face rather than to give depth to the lows. In many cases, it's used in conjunction with simple contouring so that the depths are accentuated as well as the highs. Strobing is perfect for enhancing the bridge of the nose, the forehead, and cheekbones.

Something of an advanced technique, glazing follows the principles of contouring and strobing, but uses specific product types in a prescribed fashion in order to create a stunning effect. The simple application regimen begins with a moisturizer and primer, then adds a simple bronzer to cheeks for a bit of depth, and finishes up with the strobing paradigm, using light products to highlight raised areas of the face.

Another technique that can be combined with others, baking is more about setting the scene or leaving the face in a more natural presentation. Liquid foundation in the appropriate skin tone is applied to the face as usual, then a lighter powder foundation is applied to raised areas as in a strobe. The powder is set to "bake" on the skin for ten minutes or so, merging with the liquid foundation for a more resistant and attractive effect. Excess powder is brushed off afterward.

Probably one of the most extreme techniques, chroming is the latest trend that has consumers applying a basic foundation, then using lipstick as the product and application choice for definition. The lipstick, in a shade that's a bit lighter than the skin, is applied to the face to create highlights, above the cheekbones , on the nose, and between brows. Then applicator sponges or pads are used to blend in the colour with the foundation to create stunning highlights.

Every trend has its supporters and detractors, and every artistic movement winds being in agreement with or in opposition to a movement that has preceded it. Enter "nontouring", a reaction to the contouring craze where the goal is to leave the face as natural as possible. In this case, a simple foundation along with some highlighting or shading is the extent of the make-up routine, leaving the face as natural and as fresh as possible. The goal is more to equalize the face's tones and cover blemishes than to create dramatic effects.

Applicator Options

These are just some of the techniques that have recently been in vogue. There are so many tricks and styles of make-up application we would be hard-pressed to create a comprehensive list of them. In any case, the ancillary items required to apply them are legion. Packaging firms that work with colour cosmetic items should be prepared to understand what's happening and be able to provide a variety of applicators to accompany their wares. The space is booming!

Now, for your viewing pleasure, we present one of YouTube's most popular bloggers showing netizens the strobing technique.

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  • Modified 25 APR 2017
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